FlippinWendy Design Therapy: How It Works

Let's talk about Design Therapy. Design Therapy is a consultation service I offer for those needing a VERY budget friendly solution to their design woes. I have plenty of clients that are willing to make most of the design decisions and material hunting on their own, but just want some pointers before they start tearing things up. Most have so many ideas they just want help them narrow down all of the options. So, I offer a one hour consultation I call Design Therapy where we talk about the following:

  • Floor plan solutions
  • Color schemes
  • Tile selections
  • What not to do
  • Outside the box ideas
  • How to fix particularly perplexing situations
  • Where to find materials
  • Anything renovation and design related

Design Therapy is similar to eDesign services in that we start the same way. Both services begin with you sending me information about your project, the deliverable is where they differ. Design Therapy is verbal, over the phone or in-person (in the Phoenix area). You'll send me some information and then we'll discuss solutions.

Let's talk about the process and how it works.

The Process

The example we will use is a client we had in Cincinnati, Ohio. Remember, we are in Phoenix. We never once stepped foot in their house. 

Let's begin. For your Design Therapy session, we only need three things! Those are...

1. Fill Out Questionnaire

The first step is to fill out our questionnaire. From this questionnaire we'll be able to have a good feel for your project and what to prepare ourselves for. If we need more information we'll reach out to you for that, but do your best to give us ALL the info upfront. We'll also ask for a link to your Pinterest board if you have one. If not or if you have trouble with figuring out the linking, don't worry about it. We'll get it later.

Once you submit this questionnaire, we'll email you back with a list of things we'll need from you before we chat. 


Phoenix residents: Design Therapy is the same for you, however since I will see your space in person, you are off the hook for #2 & #3!


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2. Send Photos + Video

You'll need to send us photos from every angle of the space in question. Make sure you are standing as far back in each corner of the room as you can. Try to get at least 2 walls in the photo. If you have to stand in a closet or doorway to get a wide angled shot of the room, do it. Whatever it takes! Sacrifice yourself for the sake of design! JK don't do that. Get as much of the room as you can. We also very much appreciate video tours! It helps us get our bearings plus we love your color commentary. Below are examples of before photos from our Cincinnati eDesign client. These photos are shot vertically. The space is small and capturing it all was tough for our client. If possible, we prefer horizontal shots. 

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3. Send a Sketch

If relevant to your project, send a sketch of the current floor plan. The example to the right sent to us by our client is awesome, yet above and beyond what we need. While the details are excellent, a simple hand drawn sketch works just as well. Click on it to see the details.

  1. Start by drawing the outline of the room. It doesn't have to be perfect or to scale. If you want to get fancy, break out that ruler from 3rd grade and use it to make straight lines
  2. Add wall dimensions. Be sure to include dimensions and distances of objects, too. For instance, note the width of a window and its distance from the nearest wall.
  3. Put notes on the side for consideration. Include things like "ductwork here", "window height is 48", 18" from the floor" and "ceiling height is 96". You don't need to be any more accurate than down to a quarter of an inch.

The more detail you provide, the more accurate we can be in our Design Therapy Session. Don't worry about it being a perfect drawing. Below is a sketch I did to start a client's kitchen renovation. You can see it is as imperfect as it gets. I forgot to mention in this drawing where the plumbing was, but I remember. I've been there. I haven't been to your house, though. Point those sorts of things out.

That's it! Once you have sent these three items you'll just need to make your payment and therapy can begin!

Therapy Session Begins

Once we've received everything from you, we'll meet over the phone. The session will loosely follow this plan:

  1. Intro: For the first few minutes you'll give me the grand tour into what we are tackling. I will have already reviewed the information you have sent but it is always good to start from the beginning. You'll tell me your woes and wishes for the space. Usually I can get to know you a little bit more before diving into the design.
  2. Dig Deeper: I'll dig a little deeper asking you some questions so I can put together a plan in my head.
  3. Spew time: Design ideas coming at you. Floor plan ideas, colors, materials, etc...we'll talk ideas until something settles in. 
  4. Review: We will have discussed a ton of stuff at this point so we'll review what we finally decided.

Again, this is a very loose plan. Most importantly we will be discussing whatever it is you want. So, if you want to tell me about your powder room and then switch to the backsplash in your kitchen, so be it. 

What You'll Receive

Design Therapy is mostly verbal. During our session I'll take notes of anything I want to send you for further clarification and will via email afterward. With Design Therapy no physical design plan will be delivered. If after our discussion you decide you would prefer to receive a formal plan via eDesign, you can let me know at that time. That said, Design Therapy is not my attempt to sell you on eDesign. I'll give you everything I've got during our discussion. If you want an estimate for eDesign, I'll send it your way. The cost of your Design Therapy session would be deducted from the eDesign cost. (learn more about eDesign here)

If Design Therapy sounds up your alley, feel free to get started with the first step!

* If you want help but you don't know which service you want, that's cool. It all starts with the design questionnaire. Just choose "not sure" in the drop down box when filling out the form.