brick

Before & After: Clarendon Exterior

Covered Patio with Salvaged Doors, Kitchen Bar and Neutral decor

Hey-O! It's time to get into the nitty gritty with my Clarendon project that closed yesterday! I want to show you guys how and why we did what we did. It's always a sort of jigsaw puzzle and I like to explain it in case it can help you with your own renovation puzzle. Let's go....

Floor Plan Problems

This home was a 1469 square foot ranch with a carport in one of the most sought after neighborhoods in Phoenix called Arcadia. As much as I like to keep home sizes as-is and not resort to additions, this home needed it to keep up with the Jones' (aka the trend for the rest of the neighborhood). So, we expanded the footprint. 

Before

Brick Ranch Before Clarendon PRoject

After

Farmhouse Style White Brick Ranch Home with Cedar Shutters

Changes Up Front

We enclosed the original carport and added to the front of it to make a tandem garage. Due to the lot size and setbacks, this was the only way to fit a two car garage situation.  You can see in the after photo that the new garage sits in front of the old carport. There are two garage doors, one on the front and one on the back. Here in Phoenix, many "older" neighborhoods like this one have an alley in the back for trash pick up and electric poles and other hideous nonsense. So, we added an RV gate for access through the alley to the backyard and back garage door. Technically with both doors open, you could start from the driveway and drive straight through the garage, through the backyard and through the RV gate to the alley.

The photo below shows how we bumped out the garage, the rear addition we also added and the backyard that had yet to be fenced off from the alley.

Photo courtesy  AZ Conctracting  

Photo courtesy AZ Conctracting 

With the expansion of the garage in the front, you can see that it created a small courtyard type patio to the front entry. We also added to the back of the house, so we used the old bricks that came off the back wall of the house when we tore it down as the pavers for the new pathway and patio. I would have preferred there to be a larger patio space, but since we were recycling bricks we made it as big as we could with what we had.

Recycled brick patio entry white exterior

Another recycled + upcycled addition to this home are the shutters. These shutters were made with cedar wood siding we tore off of my 72nd Place home (scroll to the third and fourth photo) from last year. This wood has been hanging out in a huge pile in my backyard and finally found new life at this home in multiple locations. 

Side note: It is dead of summer here and temps are hovering around 118 degrees, so the lawn is not as green as I'd like, but it'll fill in again. Luckily this neighborhood comes with irrigation. If you don't know what that it is it's basically where you open a trap door in the backyard every two weeks and flood your yard. Once that is back on its normal schedule, the grass will be lush and green.

Updates In The Back

If you refer to the drone photo above, you can see that we added a horseshoe shaped area to the back of the home. The left side is the new master bedroom, the middle received an extension to the family room and the right is the new kitchen. The empty space in the middle is the new patio which received a flat roof cover. The result is this patio sandwiched between the master bedroom and kitchen with access from the living room.

Covered farmhouse style patio with severy bar window and salvaged wood doors

True story: this addition and back patio was all designed around that servery bar window. I've been dreaming about that sort of deal for ages and finally was able to "force" one into submission. This, my friends, is just one reason why a person flips houses. It's an outlet to put into action the ideas that you can't fit or afford in your own house. 

Servery bar window pass through kitchen
Farmhouse style patio with bar servery window

The original plan was to have these four salvaged doors that I purchased from Sweet Salvage open as two sets of french doors to the patio. However, after further review, I decided I didn't want to have all of those doors swinging into the living space and two doors banging into each other in the middle. So, we opted to make two of them fixed and have just one set of french doors in the middle. I can't believe this actually worked. Sometimes you have great intentions of saving and reusing the old things, but then the plan flops because old things are....OLD. Not this time. Old things win. 

Farmhouse patio with bar

I'm very pleased with how this turned out. Sometimes you have a vision and it just doesn't reach your expectations but this one certainly did. I love that we could make the old brick and the board and batten on the new additions blend by using the same color paint. I also love that we could make use of some of the materials that came off the back of the house and siding from another house. Lots of old and new going on here which makes me happy.

More to come about this house. I know you guys had a lot of questions about the other rooms. Stay tuned!


Details

Sources

Barn Sconces - Amazon

Bar Stools - Target

Black and White Towel - LCo Design Co.

Cane Chair - thrifted

House Numbers - Home Depot

Marble Counters - Aracruz 

Patio Chairs White - Target

Pillows Black and White - Target

Planter Hanging - estate sale

Planter Turquoise on front patio - Home Depot

Planter White w/Palm Tree - Home Goods

Rug Black Diamond Doormat - Target

Rug Jute (discontinued as of posting) - Pottery Barn

Rug Gray Patterned - West Elm

Salvaged Wood Doors - Sweet Salvage

Servery Bar Window - custom made contractor

Shutters - custom made by contractor

Wicker Chairs on Front Patio - thrifted

Wood Table on Back Patio  - Everything Goes

Paint Colors

Exterior Walls: Behr Whisper White

Exterior Doors: Dunn Edwards Novelty Navy

 

Kitchen Redesign: Schoolhouse Modern

Jessie Deye, otherwise known as @gymgirljessie, and I have been talking about her space for several months now. Back and forth we’ve chatted about what should she do about the floors, what about the ceiling, the counter, etc. I finally put together a design for her which ended up being what I would call a Modern Schoolhouse Kitchen. I took the aspects she had already decided on, like white cabinets and dark floors, and added the rest of the pieces to finish the look. Like many homeowners, she was getting overwhelmed by the multitude of decisions she had to make and trying to get it all in under budget. Mood boards are really helpful because you can see the whole room all at once rather than just imagining how it will all fit together. Even more difficult, in her situation, is trying to make decisions for a room that is changing by the week! 

The Before

Jessie’s kitchen was once a dining room. Two walls came down opening it up to the living room and eliminating a hallway. The living room was once lofted to the bedroom above but will now receive a new ceiling closing it in. The ceiling in what will be the new kitchen was torn out to expose the 100+ year old beams. Soon she’ll have new beams next to old beams, which was also a source of mental anguish. Don’t worry, there is a solution.

The Blueprint

The Design

 

The Road Map

  1. Ceiling: The most difficult piece of the puzzle! Jessie and I went back and forth on this one. Paint the whole thing or don’t paint it? "Ruin" the 100 year old wood or not? Let the living room and kitchen ceilings live side by side in awkwardness of new boards and old boards? No. There was no solution. Until there was! Finally, after lots of searching, I found the answer. Paint some of it. Dun Dun DUN!!!! Seriously, though. Instead of doing it all or nothing, why not make it a statement…ON THE CEILING? Paint most of the ceiling so it ties the two rooms together, but leave a strip above the island unfinished. Imagine how your eye will be pulled up to this fabulous unfinished section of beams of the room. Now this section and the old as crap wood will be highlighted. IT WILL ROCK.
  2. Flooring: In order to save some cash, the pine floors will be refinished. A dark stain will help the floor fade away to showcase the exposed brick walls and fabulous ceiling. Sometimes dark floors are poo poo-ed for their ability to highlight dirt. But, since Jessie’s unit is at the top of the building, it’s likely most of any dirt that would be tracked in would be gone by the time anyone gets to her door.
  3. Cabinets: Shaker cabinets are easy to find these days and will be around for a long time making them a good choice. There will be a large island with seating which will hold the dishwasher and a microwave on the end. The cabinetry will also run the length of the back wall. Instead of upper cabinets, shelving will flank either side of the range hood. 
  4. Shelving: This is an opportunity to get some rustic barn wood into the design to balance out the newness of the rest of the kitchen. The gas pipe shelving has been a favorite of hers in the past, although she could opt for black iron brackets as well.
  5. Counters: Ideally, white marble counters would be awesome with this design, but maintenance is a concern. A good alternative is a whiter granite counter such as River White granite. 
  6. Backsplash: To keep things in budget, simple and with the schoolhouse theme, I opted for white subway tile. A good go-to. To spruce it up a bit, a darker gray grout would be a good option. It could run to the ceiling, but since the ceilings are 11 feet tall, I’d suggest running it to just below the first shelf.
  7. Furnishings: These stools are interesting with the bendy metal bases but have the fun spinn-y tops. Gotta give Jessie somewhere to spin.
  8. Fixtures and Hardware: The lighting has to be simple in a schoolhouse design. A couple of simple shape-y glass pendant lights will bring a little sparkle to the room without being bulky and intrusive. The faucet has a powerful, utilitarian look. The cabinet pulls are clean lined, pewter schoolhouse pulls that finish off the look.

So, that’s it. I can’t wait to see the final room which should be finishing up sometime this winter. Let's hope for some after pics!