Before & After: Clarendon Exterior

Covered Patio with Salvaged Doors, Kitchen Bar and Neutral decor

Hey-O! It's time to get into the nitty gritty with my Clarendon project that closed yesterday! I want to show you guys how and why we did what we did. It's always a sort of jigsaw puzzle and I like to explain it in case it can help you with your own renovation puzzle. Let's go....

Floor Plan Problems

This home was a 1469 square foot ranch with a carport in one of the most sought after neighborhoods in Phoenix called Arcadia. As much as I like to keep home sizes as-is and not resort to additions, this home needed it to keep up with the Jones' (aka the trend for the rest of the neighborhood). So, we expanded the footprint. 

Before

Brick Ranch Before Clarendon PRoject

After

Farmhouse Style White Brick Ranch Home with Cedar Shutters

Changes Up Front

We enclosed the original carport and added to the front of it to make a tandem garage. Due to the lot size and setbacks, this was the only way to fit a two car garage situation.  You can see in the after photo that the new garage sits in front of the old carport. There are two garage doors, one on the front and one on the back. Here in Phoenix, many "older" neighborhoods like this one have an alley in the back for trash pick up and electric poles and other hideous nonsense. So, we added an RV gate for access through the alley to the backyard and back garage door. Technically with both doors open, you could start from the driveway and drive straight through the garage, through the backyard and through the RV gate to the alley.

The photo below shows how we bumped out the garage, the rear addition we also added and the backyard that had yet to be fenced off from the alley.

Photo courtesy  AZ Conctracting  

Photo courtesy AZ Conctracting 

With the expansion of the garage in the front, you can see that it created a small courtyard type patio to the front entry. We also added to the back of the house, so we used the old bricks that came off the back wall of the house when we tore it down as the pavers for the new pathway and patio. I would have preferred there to be a larger patio space, but since we were recycling bricks we made it as big as we could with what we had.

Recycled brick patio entry white exterior

Another recycled + upcycled addition to this home are the shutters. These shutters were made with cedar wood siding we tore off of my 72nd Place home (scroll to the third and fourth photo) from last year. This wood has been hanging out in a huge pile in my backyard and finally found new life at this home in multiple locations. 

Side note: It is dead of summer here and temps are hovering around 118 degrees, so the lawn is not as green as I'd like, but it'll fill in again. Luckily this neighborhood comes with irrigation. If you don't know what that it is it's basically where you open a trap door in the backyard every two weeks and flood your yard. Once that is back on its normal schedule, the grass will be lush and green.

Updates In The Back

If you refer to the drone photo above, you can see that we added a horseshoe shaped area to the back of the home. The left side is the new master bedroom, the middle received an extension to the family room and the right is the new kitchen. The empty space in the middle is the new patio which received a flat roof cover. The result is this patio sandwiched between the master bedroom and kitchen with access from the living room.

Covered farmhouse style patio with severy bar window and salvaged wood doors

True story: this addition and back patio was all designed around that servery bar window. I've been dreaming about that sort of deal for ages and finally was able to "force" one into submission. This, my friends, is just one reason why a person flips houses. It's an outlet to put into action the ideas that you can't fit or afford in your own house. 

Servery bar window pass through kitchen
Farmhouse style patio with bar servery window

The original plan was to have these four salvaged doors that I purchased from Sweet Salvage open as two sets of french doors to the patio. However, after further review, I decided I didn't want to have all of those doors swinging into the living space and two doors banging into each other in the middle. So, we opted to make two of them fixed and have just one set of french doors in the middle. I can't believe this actually worked. Sometimes you have great intentions of saving and reusing the old things, but then the plan flops because old things are....OLD. Not this time. Old things win. 

Farmhouse patio with bar

I'm very pleased with how this turned out. Sometimes you have a vision and it just doesn't reach your expectations but this one certainly did. I love that we could make the old brick and the board and batten on the new additions blend by using the same color paint. I also love that we could make use of some of the materials that came off the back of the house and siding from another house. Lots of old and new going on here which makes me happy.

More to come about this house. I know you guys had a lot of questions about the other rooms. Stay tuned!


Details

Sources

Barn Sconces - Amazon

Bar Stools - Target

Black and White Towel - LCo Design Co.

Cane Chair - thrifted

House Numbers - Home Depot

Marble Counters - Aracruz 

Patio Chairs White - Target

Pillows Black and White - Target

Planter Hanging - estate sale

Planter Turquoise on front patio - Home Depot

Planter White w/Palm Tree - Home Goods

Rug Black Diamond Doormat - Target

Rug Jute (discontinued as of posting) - Pottery Barn

Rug Gray Patterned - West Elm

Salvaged Wood Doors - Sweet Salvage

Servery Bar Window - custom made contractor

Shutters - custom made by contractor

Wicker Chairs on Front Patio - thrifted

Wood Table on Back Patio  - Everything Goes

Paint Colors

Exterior Walls: Behr Whisper White

Exterior Doors: Dunn Edwards Novelty Navy

 

27th Street: Value Add, Rocks Aren't Bad

So, I've been doing this house flipping thing for 10 years. But, your mind doesn't know that. Your mind just thinks, "Hey! I can't move away from Cincinnati. What about my business!? What about my people!?" But then one winter you are FED UP. You're moving to Phoenix. So we did.

I've already talked about that. But, let me tell you about the first house I tackled. It was the perfect house for my first desert flip. Not too big, not too small. It didn't need an addition like so many homes here "need". No pool. Not much in the way of desert landscape. The budget wouldn't allow for it. 

So, that leaves the fun stuff. Mid-century modern has a greater presence than where I'm from and I was excited to infuse some into this boring, drab ranch. Behold the exterior before:

A typical person might think, "Ew that's dirty." The investor thinks, "Value add!" Turn that carport into a garage! Boom. 

This is one of the easiest things to do to a home and gain lots of brownie points. The only problem was the two bedroom windows in the carport. The front bedroom was easy. Just take it out, there is another. This was actually better for that bedroom because now there was one wall without a door or window obstruction. Helpful when you want to have a bed somewhere! The back bedroom, however, had only one window and it was in the carport. Thanks to my contractor, Pace's quick thinking, we decided to make the new garage more shallow on the right side and move the window further down the wall. The new window is in the back of the house behind the garage now. A car still fits the shallower space, it's just not as deep as the other side of the garage. And, because of this jog in the wall, we were able to put a door to the back from the inside the garage which can be seen in the next photo.

In the back behind the garage where the new window now sits, there is still roof overhead. This gave us an opportunity to have a secluded covered patio. If you are looking in the before picture through the carport, the new patio sits where the old fence once lived. Check out the new space.

Also in the back was about a billion square feet of dirt. 

I would have loved to turn this into a desert oasis, but the monies said NO. So, we did what we could to make it a clean blank slate. I know, I know. It's a lot of rocks. "We" do that here. You get rocks or you get pretty interior. Take it or leave it.

Continuing on around the house to the back door, was a serious lack in entertainment area unless you consider the beat up grill and more dirt. So, some dollars went toward a simple patio with a simple pergola. Honestly, there were no funds for this. This was a "splurge" in the sense that it was not "necessary", but I knew it was important to have something break up all the rocks. The pergola was a modern take on the traditional sense of one. I borrowed this idea from a home I saw around town.

My original idea was to have fabric woven in between the slats of the pergola and big bulbed lights strung criss cross across the dealio. The truth is I ran out of time, money and energy. This isn't like your home where you can tinker around with a room for months before you get it just right. As soon as the paint dries and the cleaning crew is gone, it's a mad dash to move in half a house full of furniture and decor. I didn't even wait for them to be done cleaning really. I barged in and unloaded my things. Everything has to be ready with in a day or two in order to get the photographer their time. To source fabric, pay for it and then have to remember a staple gun AND STAPLES. Guh. NTY. So, new owners...do that to that pergola. It will be great.

Swinging back around to the front, I loved making this house bold, like nothing else on the street.

The colors were jarring to me at first with the dark walls and the bright trim, but once the grass had grown in and the front door was painted, all was well. A lesson in patience. Big picture, people.

There you have it. A rundown ranch home transformed into a mid-century-ish sparkly new ranch home. I hope this post helps to understand the thought process behind how a house gets flipped and the many decisions that are made behind the scenes! It's not easy to make some judgement calls but we do our best to make a great new home for the new homeowner.

Details:

  • Exterior wall colorSW Urbane Bronze
  • Front door color: Dunn Edwards Skipping Stones
  • Trim color: Behr Ultra White
  • Door Hardware: Kwikset Milan in Black 
  • Potted Container and cactus: Home Depot terracotta painted gray
  • House numbers: Home Depot
  • Pendant Light: Wayfair discontinued