farmhouse

Before & After: The Shiplap Shower Bathroom

This is one of my favorite bathrooms I've ever done. So, it's shocking I haven't written a Before & After post for it yet. It wasn't even a bathroom to start. It was a bedroom. This home desperately needed an upstairs bathroom, preferably a kick ass master bath. I've talked about this puzzle of a layout change before so if you want to dig into that, go here. But the gist of it is that this was a walk through bedroom to another bedroom which is lame AF. So, I chopped said lame bedroom up into a hallway, laundry closet, spiral stairway to the rooftop deck, master closet and master bath. Yes it all fit. 

So, as I was saying I turned this into a bathroom. There was a closet that sat directly over the stairway below so naturally I thought it was the perfect fit for a shower. Luckily it was a big closet. At least where 130 year old houses are concerned. Here is that seriously fancy closet. Looking at it there, can you believe that became a shower?

Shiplap Shower Master Bath Before

So since this was a bedroom turned hallway + other rooms, that meant that it was going to have to be long and narrow (to balance out the long narrow hallway on the other side. It's geometry, k? That worked for me. Making this bathroom all along one side of the room made it so these large windows would also be a part of it. Boom. Let there be light. Below is the floor plan. Before on the left, after on the right.

Next was filling in the finish materials. The very first piece to go into this room was the sink. In fact the room was pretty much built around it. Behold the sink I found in another bedroom in this house. Weird, yes. But how lucky could a girl get?

And here it is salvaged and reglazed for its new life.

Next was the shower. At this point I was super bored with everything out there in tile land. Subway tile was all the rage but I had already slated it for the first floor bathroom. Shiplap was also all the rage but nobody makes tiles that long. For some reason I really got stuck on this whole shiplap shower idea and finally just asked my contractor, Joe Wood of All Around Joe, what we could do to make it happen. We figured it out and boom, the world's first shiplap shower. I kid it wasn't but dang I think I was like #3 or 4 at least! But, actually any shiplap showers I had seen had overlapped the boards like siding. I didn't want that. Joe figured out the solution.

Read my interview with Joe Wood about how he made this happen!

Next was flooring and lighting. My intern at the time, Nick Fix was instrumental in these two areas. Despite being only 17 years old at the time, Nick had a great design eye. He walked into the newly framed space for the first time and suggested it should have pendant lights hanging down from the very tall ceilings. Since the room was long and narrow, when you stood at the door, you would see these pendant lights straight down the middle. He was right. It was a great call. I was obsessed with these wire and glass pendants from Pottery Barn so I was very excited to get to use them. They had a good mix of farmhouse and industrial style I was looking for.

Nick had actually gone through a bathroom renovation at his Mom's house and had a ton of extra tile leftover. I bought it off of him and his Mom. Win win!

I love the way everything came together. We used a farm style sconce over the sink, a shiny chrome wall mount faucet on the farm sink, 5 panel doors painted Behr Iron Mountain and included iron black door handles. I also remembered that I had these sweet little vintage glass towel bars I picked up from Village Salvage in Waynesville, OH. They only needed a little shining to be salvaged and ready to go. The final pieces was that great wood mirror from Crate & Barrel. The sink was an odd size so finding an appropriate mirror was tricky. This mirror fit above it perfectly.

More links to shop this room are at the bottom of this post.

And then the before and after photos because that's why we do this...

I'm very pleased with how this room turned out. Shocked even. I mean how does a bedroom become like 5 new rooms? Magic I suppose. 


Shop This Room


Before & After: Clarendon Kitchen

Ahhh this kitchen. One of the things I love about flipping and designing is there are always new projects to tackle... starting from scratch. If the project drags on for a long time, like it does when doing an addition, I get antsy. I change my mind. I redesign. This kitchen was 9 months in the making since this house had an addition added to the front and the back. Since it took so dang long, I'm really shocked that this kitchen didn't change too much throughout the process. The cabinet color changed about eleven-teen times and the lighting and hardware is different but the bulk of it is pretty much what was planned. 

But I digress. Let's go back to the beginning. Below is the original kitchen in this home.

REtro Kitchen Before Renovation

This is not the same room mind you. This room was gutted and eventually became a study. As mentioned in the exterior before and after post, we added on to the back of the house and part of that addition was the kitchen. Having the kitchen at the back of the house made more sense. It's nice to be able to look out on the backyard and be closer to the outdoor entertainment area. Plus, as mentioned in that exterior post, I desperately wanted a servery window. More on that in a minute.

I started by drawing out the floor plan of the new room and then put together the design board. I try to do this even for my own projects because it makes it so much easier for the contractor to "read my mind".

Clarendon New Kitchen Floor Plan and Elevations

This post contains some Amazon affiliate links for products used or originally intended to use for this design.

Top Kitchen: Lauren Liess, Middle Kitchen: Hale House , Bottom Kitchen: CKS Design Studio, Bar stool, Sconce, Faucet, Hardware, Espresso Machine

Side note: I'm pinning like a mofo. Follow me on Pinterest if you are an obsessed design badass, too.

I'm not an artist but it gets the job done. The sketches are necessary so everyone from architect to contractor can see what I'm envisioning. A floor plan alone can't always show these kinds of details. I'd like to say that I can do a 3D rendering but why bother with that learning curve when a pencil and a ruler are much faster and just as effective? Plus I like drawing.

You can see that there is a gray color in there for the cabinet paint color but of course that didn't stick bc...time. I don't even remember what color that was. Other things changed as well, such as the hardware and the sconces because I ultimately decided against brass in this kitchen. For the design board I also threw in staging items to finish off the look. Usually it's just a "suggestion", like the bar stools. Those would have been dope AF to put into my flip but with the cabinets ending up blue and that price tag, I decided to abort that mission. 

--> Links to what I did actually use are at the bottom of this post.

Guys it's AGONY to wait for 9 months to see your creation come to life. LIKE TORTURE EVEN. I'm serious. I lose my shit. I'm not even going to try to pretend I don't. I start staging when the house hasn't even been finished or cleaned yet. I have piles of furniture in a side room waiting for the right time, which still isn't the right time but it is MY time. Not convenient for anyone but yet I still do it. Anyway....it was eventually finished.

I am very happy with the results. I made quite a few decisions in this kitchen that were a little bolder than usual. To have one out there idea is fine but 4 is nerve racking.

Out There Decision One

At the time I was designing this kitchen, I was catching quite a bit of flack about my Haver Home's kitchen and its lack of upper cabinets, thus prompting me to design yet another kitchen without upper cabinets. Wahhahahaha!!! I'll show you guys. I'll stick a giant pantry in the middle of the kitchen and you can store ALL THE THINGS....AND I'll add an actual pantry closet. Nobody can tell me no upper cabinets. NOBODY. It's sad this is how my mind works but it does.

Out There Decision 2

Something that was a stretch for me, and felt quite naughty, was the backsplash. It felt so fancy to be putting in a full slab backsplash. Mind you I've been renovating houses mostly in the $100,000-$200,000 range for a decade now, so to be pushing the luxurious limits in this kitchen felt wrong but oh so right. This house would list for $600,000 so I wanted to make sure the kitchen fit the price tag. I went for it with the marble. MARBLE EVERYWHERE. And even MARBLE to put things on. So fancy.

Out There Decision 3

Another custom design element was the hood. Custom hoods are one of the easiest things to put into a kitchen without much cost or effort. All you have to do is build a box and install a hood insert. Boom. Done. This concept is not so "out there" for me at this point, but spanning it between the pantry and fridge and forgoing any upper cabinetry here felt like a bold move. I had a bunch of cedar that we tore off of my Haver Home so we wrapped the hood with that. It brought in a nice warm farm-y element. 

Out There Decision 4

The final fun design piece that was planned from the very beginning was the servery bar window. This had to be accounted for in the architectural drafting phase. From the get go this window was going to be implemented, but for some reason was very difficult to come up with a budget friendly solution. In the end my contractor had the cabinet maker build it out. I love how it swings open all inviting like.

So there you go. An out there farm-like kitchen. Let's get one final look at this house's original kitchen (not the same room) and the new kitchen.

Clarendon Kitchen Before & After.JPG

And just for fun I'll show you the original room, or at least part of it before the addition, and the new kitchen in the same area.

Farmhouse Kitchen Before and After
Dining Room Turned Farmhouse Style Kitchen

It's all worth it for those Before and After shots! Details and finishes for this kitchen are listed below.

Get your very own Before & After starting at $250. Click here for more info.

Click through here to see more of this house.


Color Palette:

Cabinets: Dunn Edwards Long Lake

Cabinets: Dunn Edwards Long Lake

Walls: Behr Whisper White

Walls: Behr Whisper White

Doors: Dunn Edwards Novelty Navy

Doors: Dunn Edwards Novelty Navy

Counters: Arabescato Carrara

Counters: Arabescato Carrara


Finishes Used:

Click on any photo to learn more. Some of these are affiliate links, yo.


 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Before & After: Clarendon Exterior

Covered Patio with Salvaged Doors, Kitchen Bar and Neutral decor

Hey-O! It's time to get into the nitty gritty with my Clarendon project that closed yesterday! I want to show you guys how and why we did what we did. It's always a sort of jigsaw puzzle and I like to explain it in case it can help you with your own renovation puzzle. Let's go....

Floor Plan Problems

This home was a 1469 square foot ranch with a carport in one of the most sought after neighborhoods in Phoenix called Arcadia. As much as I like to keep home sizes as-is and not resort to additions, this home needed it to keep up with the Jones' (aka the trend for the rest of the neighborhood). So, we expanded the footprint. 

Before

Brick Ranch Before Clarendon PRoject

After

Farmhouse Style White Brick Ranch Home with Cedar Shutters

Changes Up Front

We enclosed the original carport and added to the front of it to make a tandem garage. Due to the lot size and setbacks, this was the only way to fit a two car garage situation.  You can see in the after photo that the new garage sits in front of the old carport. There are two garage doors, one on the front and one on the back. Here in Phoenix, many "older" neighborhoods like this one have an alley in the back for trash pick up and electric poles and other hideous nonsense. So, we added an RV gate for access through the alley to the backyard and back garage door. Technically with both doors open, you could start from the driveway and drive straight through the garage, through the backyard and through the RV gate to the alley.

The photo below shows how we bumped out the garage, the rear addition we also added and the backyard that had yet to be fenced off from the alley.

Photo courtesy  AZ Conctracting  

Photo courtesy AZ Conctracting 

With the expansion of the garage in the front, you can see that it created a small courtyard type patio to the front entry. We also added to the back of the house, so we used the old bricks that came off the back wall of the house when we tore it down as the pavers for the new pathway and patio. I would have preferred there to be a larger patio space, but since we were recycling bricks we made it as big as we could with what we had.

Recycled brick patio entry white exterior

Another recycled + upcycled addition to this home are the shutters. These shutters were made with cedar wood siding we tore off of my 72nd Place home (scroll to the third and fourth photo) from last year. This wood has been hanging out in a huge pile in my backyard and finally found new life at this home in multiple locations. 

Side note: It is dead of summer here and temps are hovering around 118 degrees, so the lawn is not as green as I'd like, but it'll fill in again. Luckily this neighborhood comes with irrigation. If you don't know what that it is it's basically where you open a trap door in the backyard every two weeks and flood your yard. Once that is back on its normal schedule, the grass will be lush and green.

Updates In The Back

If you refer to the drone photo above, you can see that we added a horseshoe shaped area to the back of the home. The left side is the new master bedroom, the middle received an extension to the family room and the right is the new kitchen. The empty space in the middle is the new patio which received a flat roof cover. The result is this patio sandwiched between the master bedroom and kitchen with access from the living room.

Covered farmhouse style patio with severy bar window and salvaged wood doors

True story: this addition and back patio was all designed around that servery bar window. I've been dreaming about that sort of deal for ages and finally was able to "force" one into submission. This, my friends, is just one reason why a person flips houses. It's an outlet to put into action the ideas that you can't fit or afford in your own house. 

Servery bar window pass through kitchen
Farmhouse style patio with bar servery window

The original plan was to have these four salvaged doors that I purchased from Sweet Salvage open as two sets of french doors to the patio. However, after further review, I decided I didn't want to have all of those doors swinging into the living space and two doors banging into each other in the middle. So, we opted to make two of them fixed and have just one set of french doors in the middle. I can't believe this actually worked. Sometimes you have great intentions of saving and reusing the old things, but then the plan flops because old things are....OLD. Not this time. Old things win. 

Farmhouse patio with bar

I'm very pleased with how this turned out. Sometimes you have a vision and it just doesn't reach your expectations but this one certainly did. I love that we could make the old brick and the board and batten on the new additions blend by using the same color paint. I also love that we could make use of some of the materials that came off the back of the house and siding from another house. Lots of old and new going on here which makes me happy.

More to come about this house. I know you guys had a lot of questions about the other rooms. Stay tuned!


Details

Sources

Barn Sconces - Amazon

Bar Stools - Target

Black and White Towel - LCo Design Co.

Cane Chair - thrifted

House Numbers - Home Depot

Marble Counters - Aracruz 

Patio Chairs White - Target

Pillows Black and White - Target

Planter Hanging - estate sale

Planter Turquoise on front patio - Home Depot

Planter White w/Palm Tree - Home Goods

Rug Black Diamond Doormat - Target

Rug Jute (discontinued as of posting) - Pottery Barn

Rug Gray Patterned - West Elm

Salvaged Wood Doors - Sweet Salvage

Servery Bar Window - custom made contractor

Shutters - custom made by contractor

Wicker Chairs on Front Patio - thrifted

Wood Table on Back Patio  - Everything Goes

Paint Colors

Exterior Walls: Behr Whisper White

Exterior Doors: Dunn Edwards Novelty Navy